Three-wheeled motorcycles have – understandably – become increasingly popular over the past decade!
And while it seems like trikes have been around for as long as we can remember, the market for three-wheeled motorcycles only began to grow with the release of the Can-Am Spyder!
Thousands of Quebecers have opted for this three-wheeled vehicle rather than the more traditional motorcycle. If you are considering it as an alternative mode of transportation, keep in mind that the three-wheeled motorcycle has special features that must be learned and mastered before you can get into the driver’s seat.

Driving position

Regardless of a three-wheeled motorcycle’s size, one sits on it by straddling the machine, then guides it using the handlebars. From the get-go, make sure that you can easily reach all of the hand and foot controls without having to overly extend any part of your body, even if the handlebars are fully turned to one side or the other. You should also check that you are not sitting too close to the handlebars, as this could inhibit a full range of motion. If anything about your position if off or uncomfortable, have the motorcycle adjusted before heading out on the road.

Driving

While sitting on a three-wheeled motorcycle is not unlike straddling a motorcycle, driving the former is more like being at the wheel of a car: the vehicle turns by following the angle of the front wheel (like a car) and not because the driver has leaned to the left or right. When taking a curve, you will thus feel yourself hugging the outside of the lane, much like when at the wheel of a car. Our training content on driving a three-wheeled motorcycle explains this notion in greater detail!

Clothing

Many people unfortunately give too little thought to the clothing they wear when setting off on a three-wheeled motorcycle, most likely because the widespread belief that this type of vehicle is not one that can topple over very easily. And yet, clothing is the only thing that truly protects driver and passenger in the event of an accident. Consult the SAAQ Web site for recommendations regarding motorcycle helmets and other protective gear for ‘regular’ and three-wheeled motorcycles.
 

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